Archival photo from the Seattle Times

Old hotel full of memories finds room for a new start

In the past 10 years, the Publix has had few occupants — a handful of businesses, artists and pigeons. Today paint blisters off the ceiling in the lobby, crumbling into grit that coats the oyster-cracker-shaped floor tiles and wooden front desk.

Now this Chinatown International District hotel is at the corner of history and change.

Read it in the Seattle Times. Originally published July 31, 2013.


All Things Considered airs “Why Music Matters”

This segment was perhaps my favorite segment EVER On NPR, and that from a very long time listener. Big words, but I’m saying them. Bravo NPR. Truly spectacular segment.

— commenter “William K” on the story, “Finding Hope, With The Cranberries’ Help”

I was honored that Weekend’s on All Things Considered picked up the series I produced for KEXP, and even surprised one interviewee with a phone call from his favorite artists. Find the stories at

Regulators Couldn’t Close U.S. Mine Despite Poor Safety Record

The West Virginia mine where two workers were fatally injured on Monday consistently violated federal mine safety laws, but federal regulators say they were unable to shut it down completely.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration confirmed that two workers were killed on May 12 when coal and rocks burst from mine walls at Patriot Coal’s Brody No. 1 mine in Boone County, W.Va.

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Striking farmworkers say Sakuma threatened to evict them

BURLINGTON — Against a backdrop of blackberries ripening in the afternoon sun, about 100 striking migrant farmworkers at Sakuma Bros. Farms chanted and protested here Wednesday after wage negotiations with the company broke down and the latest work stoppage entered a third day.

The workers say Sakuma has threatened to evict them from company-owned housing if they don’t return to work.

Read it in the Seattle Times. Originally published July 24, 2013.

Chopping Chicken in Missouri: Immigrants — Not Locals — Still Fill the Processing Lines

Outside the Tyson plant in Noel, Mo., a sign reads, “Now hiring, call today.” Immigrants and refugees are the ones flocking to work here, not locals.

At 4:30 p.m., cars arrive at the plant to drop off night shift workers wearing flowered skirts and hijabs. The approximately 1,500 employees come from Africa, the Pacific, Latin America and Asia.

Aired on PRI’s The World May 14, 2013.

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